Liberal Government is taking Confederation OUT of the 150th Anniversary of Confederation

April 22, 2016

Confederation

Liberals Continuing their “War on History”-Van Loan

 OTTAWA, ONTARIO — The Liberal Government is leaving the subject of Confederation out of the observances of the 150th Anniversary of Canada. In a April 14th, appearance at a Parliamentary Committee, the Minister of Heritage outlined the government’s themes for celebration. Confederation is not one of them. In fact, Canada’s history is nowhere to be found among the themes of this celebration of Canada’s history.

“Why the war on history?” asked Conservative Heritage Critic Peter Van Loan today in the House of Commons.

Minister Melanie Joly, while calling the celebrations “the 150th Anniversary of Confederation,” told the committee that the government’s “themes are youth, indigenous reconciliation, the environment, and inclusion and diversity.” Joly defended the exclusion of Confederation as a theme of the 150th Anniversary of Confederation, saying “we shouldn’t be playing politics” with it.

Van Loan criticized the Liberal reasoning for excluding Confederation as a theme in the House today, saying that “Confederation is the ultimate Canadian example of bi-partisan nation-building.” The 36 Fathers of Confederation came from both the Liberal and Conservative Parties. “Admittedly, Conservatives John A. Macdonald and George Etienne Cartier drove the project—but Macdonald’s arch-rivals George Brown and Oliver Mowat were partners and full founding fathers,” said Van Loan.

“Why the Liberal war on History?” He asked, while encouraging the government to make Confederation a theme of the 150th Anniversary of Confederation.

Earlier this year the Liberals began their war on History with an announcement that they would be rewriting the book for prospective new Canadian citizens because “it’s a bit heavy on the War of 1812.” Less than one page in the 68 page citizenship guide dealt with this significant conflict, whose outcome assured the existence of Canada as a country separate from the United States.